ABOUT THE EU WATER LAW AND PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Back in 2000, the EU adopted extensive legislation to better protect and preserve the sources of our water – the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD). The law obliges all EU countries to achieve good status for EU water bodies by 2015, and 2027 at the very latest. 

 

The WFD is one of the most important pieces of EU environmental legislation ever to pass. It recognises that modifying or degrading our waters comes at a price and, if we want to ensure we have enough clean water in the future, we must take good care of our rivers, lakes, wetlands, groundwater streams and coastal waters. That’s why it is so important to keep this law strong - but it is currently under threat!

WHY DO WE WANT TO KEEP THE LAW AS IT IS? 

The WFD is one of the most holistic and progressive EU environmental policies to date. It recognises that, if we are to have enough good quality water in the future, we must look after our freshwater ecosystems.

 

Exploiting our freshwater ecosystems ALWAYS comes at a price. For example, dams and other infrastructure (such as for the purposes of hydropower, flood defence and navigation) change a river’s natural flow and stop species from reproducing. Unsustainable agriculture pollutes freshwater ecosystems and dries them out by using too much water - this destroys the habitats of vulnerable species and important services (such as purifying our water and storing carbon, irrigating crops and protecting us from floods!). 

 

The WFD identifies all of these so-called ‘pressures’ on our freshwater ecosystems and tackles them in one integrated plan. In doing so, the law aims to reverse the trend of deterioration of our waters, and the decline of the wildlife they house.

 

Over the past 18 years, the WFD has proved to be an effective, flexible and modern piece of legislation. Where properly implemented, there have been clear improvements in the health of our waters – particularly with regards to some pollutants. Moreover, thanks to this law, decision-makers have a much clearer idea of how important these ecosystems are, of their current state, and of things which make them unhealthy. The WFD has also been instrumental in ensuring public participation in water-related decision making.  

IF THIS LAW IS SO STRONG, WHY ARE EUROPE'S WATERS STILL IN A BAD STATE?

To be effective, laws have to be strong both on paper and in practice – and the WFD has so far been poorly implemented by EU Member States. As a result, the WFD’s initial objective of achieving good status for all Europe’s waters by 2015 was missed by a very long shot.

WHY ACT NOW?

The WFD is undergoing its standard review (known as a ‘fitness check’), and EU Member States have used this opportunity to initiate a strong attack on the WFD. Their aim is to weaken some of the law’s particularly progressive and strong elements. 

 

But we can’t let this happen – a weak WFD would be a terrible blow for our rivers, lakes and wetlands, and everything that depends on them. Without a strong law, they would even more vulnerable to pollution and the construction of destructive infrastructure, for example, for human-made ‘grey’ flood defence, navigation and hydropower. 

 

Don’t delay! Help us keep the WFD strong by having your say

 

WHY IS THE WFD BEING REVIEWED? 

Every piece of EU legislation undergoes a fitness check after it has been in force for a number of years. The aim is to evaluate whether it is still “fit for purpose” by looking into whether it is still relevant for meeting the objectives, adds value at European level, and is generally effective and consistent with other policies. 

 

The fitness check of the WFD officially started in 2018 and is expected to conclude in 2019 with a “Fitness Check Report” of the European Commission. After the report is published, the Council of the EU (which is composed of EU Member States) and the European Parliament will have an opportunity to react on the Commission’s conclusions. 

 

The fitness check of EU water legislation covers the WFD, as well as the WFD’s associated or ‘daughter’ Directives (the Groundwater Directive and Environmental Quality Standards Directive), and the Floods Directive. At the same time the European Commission is also evaluating the Urban Waste Water Treatment Directive, implementation of which is also part of the framework. 

WHAT IS A 'PUBLIC CONSULTATION' AND WHY SHOULD I TAKE PART?

The public consultation is a standard part of any fitness check and designed to collect opinions on existing EU legislation. It is open to everyone and your ONLY opportunity to make your voice heard by decision-makers. 

 

The public consultation on the WFD, is open from 17 September 2018 to 4 March 2019.  It is an online questionnaire composed of two parts – a general one which is more suitable for the general public, and an expert one directed at key stakeholders.

 

The EU’s goal is to collect the available evidence on the performance of the current WFD, draw lessons from the implementation so far, explore possible difficulties with its implementation and open a structured dialogue with all those concerned. The results of the questionnaire will contribute directly to the EU's fitness check of the WFD.

 

This is where we need YOU to help protect this crucial law. 

 

By filling in our form, you can quickly and easily send our recommended responses to the public consultation straight to the European Commission. If you care about defending Europe’s waters, just fill in your details and click ‘Act Now’

 

However, the European Commission has so far only launched the public consultation in English. Due to the delay in making the questions available in all official languages (and thus to all EU citizens), we decided to start our public engagement campaign by answering only two questions and to translate the answers into all languages. With these answers, however, we address all the main aspects of the WFD review, indicating why we believe the law is fit for purpose and should be maintained.

 

Please click here to read the EU’s questions and our recommended response, and an explanation of why these answers have been selected.

 

WHY DO EU GOVERNMENTS WANT TO WEAKEN THE WFD?

Member States all have different reasons for wanting to weaken the WFD and this depends on the pressures that their waters are under. However, they do have some shared characteristics:

 

LOW AMBITION 

 

Full implementation of the WFD requires commitment and appropriate funding. However, instead of investing in nature conservation and taking the required actions to protect and restore their rivers, Member States are favouring short-term political efforts in other areas (unrelated to water, of course). Moreover, Member States have not conducted analyses that would show how reaching the WFD’s targets could benefit society at large, for example, in terms of people’s health and wellbeing.

 

FEAR OF INFRINGEMENT PROCEDURES

 

Member States missed their initial objective of bringing all waters to good status by 2015 by a very long shot – so they’re now feeling the pressure and need to step up their game in order to achieve the WFD’s objectives by 2027 (the final deadline). If they don’t, the European Commission could take them to court by opening a so-called ‘infringement procedure’. Fearing these consequences, Member States prefer to opt for the easy way out: weakening the requirements and introducing greater flexibility for themselves.

 

VESTED ECONOMIC INTERESTS AND PRESSURE FROM POWERFUL LOBBIES

 

Agriculture and industry (e.g. hydropower/energy companies, flood defence construction, and navigation/shipping) are sectors which have a huge negative impact on our waters, and thus have a strong vested interest in having a weaker regulatory framework. For instance, certain destructive hydropower, grey flood management or navigation projects, which do not benefit society, economy or nature, are currently not permitted under the WFD. 

 

Furthermore, agriculture uses a lot of water unsustainably for irrigation and excessively pollutes rivers with nitrates and pesticides. Under the WFD, however, these pressures must be managed, and users and polluters, including agriculture, must contribute their fair share to the financial and environmental costs of the water services they receive. Essentially, the WFD requires change in the unsustainable practices of these industries and sectors, which they are unwilling to carry out.